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22/01/2021 02:08:57  

CASIS Research Announcement in Technology Advancements to Leverage the ISS
22/01/2021 02:08:54  

CASIS Research Announcement in Technology Advancements to Leverage the ISS
21/01/2021 19:08:53  

CASIS Unveils Research Announcement in Technology Advancements to Leverage the ISS National Lab
21/01/2021 19:08:52  

Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex to Host Annual NASA Day of Remembrance Thursday, January 28, 2021
21/01/2021 13:08:53  

Former NASA test engineer steps into the hot seat as acting head

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has left the US space agency with none of the drama associated with certain other American government handovers.…

21/01/2021 01:08:53  

Message from NASA Acting Administrator Steve Jurczyk and Senior White House Appointee Bhavya Lal
20/01/2021 19:08:40  

Boeing's test of the largest rocket in U.S. history ended earlier than expected on Jan. 16 because a hydraulic-system setting exceeded a preset limit, dealing another setback to the company's space ambitions. From a report: The first firing of all four RS-25 engines on the Space Launch System rocket ended just 67.2 seconds into the planned eight-minute test. The so-called hot fire exercise at the NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi was designed to simulate a full flight from Earth. Engineers from NASA, Boeing and the engines' maker, Aerojet-Rocketdyne Holdings, will assess data and determine whether a second test is needed or if the rocket is ready to ship to Florida's Kennedy Space Center to prepare for its maiden flight. The SLS can be loaded with its super-chilled propellants -- liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen -- only nine times, which will be a consideration in whether to stage a second test at Stennis, NASA said Tuesday. The shutdown "was triggered by test parameters that were intentionally conservative to ensure the safety of the core stage during the test," NASA said in a blog post Tuesday. Preliminary inspections and data reviews "show the rocket's hardware is in excellent condition," the agency said. The test was cut short just as the engines began to pivot and test their thrust capability while rotating on gimbals. The premature end, before engineers collected a full array of data, represented another hurdle for Boeing's space program. The SLS rocket has been plagued by years of delays and billions of dollars in cost overruns. The program has broad support in Congress because of the federal contracts and jobs it offers across many states. Boeing also is attempting to correct glitches with its Starliner spacecraft, which would ferry astronauts to and from the International Space Station under a NASA contract. Boeing said Monday it had completed qualification of Starliner's flight software following an extensive review. A second test of the vehicle to the ISS is slated for March, following a botched flight in December 2019. A crewed flight is expected later this year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

20/01/2021 14:08:42  

Also: Qualifying Starliner and Blue Origin gets ready for humans

In brief After an initial failure in 2020, the Virgin Galactic spinout reached orbit on its second try, with the LauncherOne rocket deploying its payloads to a 500km orbit.…

20/01/2021 06:05:37  

An issue with hydraulic systems led to the early shutdown of a test for Nasa's new "megarocket".
19/01/2021 22:08:30  

NASA Invites Media to Update on Rocket Test for Artemis I Moon Mission
19/01/2021 19:08:33  

'If this scenario occurred during a flight, the rocket would have continued to fly'

After the weekend's shorter-than-hoped-for test firing of the core stage of NASA's monstrous Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, engineers have confirmed the hardware remains in "excellent condition" and blamed "test parameters that were intentionally conservative."…

19/01/2021 06:08:22  

EPA and NASA Enter Agreement on Cleanup of NASA Wallops Flight Facility Site
18/01/2021 18:08:21  

This is why we test

The Moon moved a little further from NASA over the weekend as the first firing of the Space Launch System's core stage came to an abrupt halt after only 67.2 seconds.…

18/01/2021 03:08:03  

CNN reports: A 70-foot rocket, riding beneath the wing of a retrofitted Boeing 747 aircraft, detached from the plane and fired itself into Earth's orbit on Sunday — marking the first successful launch for the California-based rocket startup Virgin Orbit. Virgin Orbit's 747, nicknamed Cosmic Girl, took off from California around 10:30 am PT with the rocket, called LauncherOne, nestled beneath the plane's left wing. The aircraft flew out over the Pacific Ocean before the rocket was released, freeing LauncherOne and allowing it to power up its rocket motor and propel itself to more than 17,000 miles per hour, fast enough to begin orbiting the Earth... The rocket flew a group of tiny satellites on behalf of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites, or ELaNa, program, which allows high school and college students to design and assemble small satellites that NASA then pays to launch into space... About four hours after takeoff on Saturday, Virgin Orbit confirmed in a tweet that all the satellites were "successfully deployed into our target orbit." The successful mission makes Virgin Orbit only the third so-called "New Space" company — startups hoping to overhaul the traditional industry with innovative technologies — to reach orbit, after SpaceX and Rocket Lab. The success also paves the way for Virgin Orbit to begin launching satellites for a host of customers that it already has lined up, including NASA, the military and private-sector companies that use satellites for commercial purposes. Virgin Orbit shared a 57-second video on Twitter showing the moment their rocket was released and then launched, saying the event went exactly as planned. "To say we're thrilled would be a massive understatement, but 240 characters couldn't do it justice anyway."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

17/01/2021 06:07:52  

"NASA declared the Mars digger dead Thursday after failing to burrow deep into the red planet to take its temperature," reports the Associated Press: Scientists in Germany spent two years trying to get their heat probe, dubbed the mole, to drill into the Martian crust. But the 16-inch-long (40-centimeter) device that is part of NASA's InSight lander couldn't gain enough friction in the red dirt. It was supposed to bury 16 feet (5 meters) into Mars, but only drilled down a couple of feet (about a half meter). Following one last unsuccessful attempt to hammer itself down over the weekend with 500 strokes, the team called it quits. "We've given it everything we've got, but Mars and our heroic mole remain incompatible," said the German Space Agency's Tilman Spohn, the lead scientist for the experiment... InSight's French seismometer, meanwhile, has recorded nearly 500 Marsquakes, while the lander's weather station is providing daily reports.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

17/01/2021 02:07:49  

"NASA's rocket charged with taking the agency back to the moon fired its four main engines Saturday afternoon, but the test in Mississippi was cut short after a malfunction caused an automatic abort," reports Florida Today... "We did get an MCF on engine four," a control room member said less than a minute into the test fire, using an initialism that stands for "major component malfunction...." The engines fired for 12 more seconds after the exchange before an automatic shutdown was called. The test was meant to last eight minutes — the full duration needed for the booster during its Artemis program liftoff — but only ran less than two minutes. Prime contractor Boeing previously said the test would need to run at least 250 seconds, or more than four minutes, for teams to gather enough data to move forward with transport to Kennedy Space Center and launch sometime before the end of the year. An exact plan moving forward, which could mean a second test and delay before transport to Florida, had not yet been released by Saturday evening. Or, as the Guardian reports, "It was unclear whether Boeing and Nasa would have to repeat the test, a prospect that could push the debut launch into 2022." In a press conference tonight, a NASA official specifically addressed the question as to whether or not a launch this year was still feasible. "I think it's still too early to tell. I think as we figure out what went wrong, we're going to know what the future holds. And right now we just don't know... "Not everything went according to script today, but we got a lot of great data, a lot of great information. I have absolutely total confidence in the team to figure out what the anomaly was, figure out how to fix it, and then get after it again... Depending on what we learn, we might not have to do it again." They added that there was no sign of engine damage, and emphasized to reporters another way to view the significance of this afternoon's event. "A rocket capable of taking humans to the moon, was firing, all four engines at the same time." And they also stressed that this afternoon's result was not a failure -- but a test. "When you test, you learn things..." "We're going to make adjustments, and we're going to fly to the moon. That's what the Artemis program is all about, that's what NASA is all about, and that's what America is all about. We didn't get everything we wanted, and yeah, we're going to have to make adjustments. But this was a test, and this is why we test. "If you're expecting perfection on a first test, then you've never tested before." "The date is set," NASA had tweeted Friday, thanking its partners Boeing Space and Aerojet Rocketdyne for Saturday's "hot fire" test of the SLS's core stage. "One of NASA's main goals for 2021 is to launch Artemis I, an uncrewed moon mission meant to show the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket can safely send humans to our lunar neighbor," reported CNET. "But first, NASA plans to make some noise with a fiery SLS test on Saturday." Below is the original report that schwit1 had shared from Space.com: It's a critical test for NASA and the final step in the agency's "Green Run" series of tests to ensure the SLS rocket is ready for its first launch... In the upcoming hot-fire engine test, engineers will load the Boeing-built SLS core booster with over 700,000 gallons of cryogenic (that's really cold) propellant into the rocket's fuel tanks and light all four of its RS-25 engines at once. The engines will fire for 485 seconds (a little over 8 minutes) and generate a whopping 1.6 million pounds of thrust throughout the test... Following the success of this hot fire test and subsequent uncrewed missions to the moon, "the next key step in returning astronauts to the moon and eventually going on to Mars," Jeff Zotti, the RS-25 program director at Aerojet Rocketdyne said during the news conference. NASA's SLS program manager John Honeycutt agreed. "This powerful rocket is going to put us in a position to be ready to support the agency in the country's deep space mission to the moon and beyond," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

16/01/2021 22:07:42  

"The date is set," NASA tweeted yesterday, thanking its partners Boeing Space and Aerojet Rocketdyne for Saturday's "hot fire" test of the SLS's core stage. "One of NASA's main goals for 2021 is to launch Artemis I, an uncrewed moon mission meant to show the Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System rocket can safely send humans to our lunar neighbor," reports CNET. "But first, NASA plans to make some noise with a fiery SLS test on Saturday." Live coverage of the event begins at 1:20 p.m. PT on NASA TV, reports Digital Trends, noting that NASA is targeting a two-hour window for the actual SLS rocket test starting 40 minutes later at 2 p.m. PT. schwit1 shares this report from Space.com: It's a critical test for NASA and the final step in the agency's "Green Run" series of tests to ensure the SLS rocket is ready for its first launch... In the upcoming hot-fire engine test, engineers will load the Boeing-built SLS core booster with over 700,000 gallons of cryogenic (that's really cold) propellant into the rocket's fuel tanks and light all four of its RS-25 engines at once. The engines will fire for 485 seconds (a little over 8 minutes) and generate a whopping 1.6 million pounds of thrust throughout the test... Following the success of this hot fire test and subsequent uncrewed missions to the moon, "the next key step in returning astronauts to the moon and eventually going on to Mars," Jeff Zotti, the RS-25 program director at Aerojet Rocketdyne said during the news conference. NASA's SLS program manager John Honeycutt agreed. "This powerful rocket is going to put us in a position to be ready to support the agency in the country's deep space mission to the moon and beyond," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

16/01/2021 21:07:42  

UPDATE: NASA TV to Air Hot Fire Test of Rocket Core Stage for Artemis Moon Missions
15/01/2021 23:07:35  

NASA Remembers Astronaut William Thornton
15/01/2021 20:07:45  

A blue day on the Red Planet

Hot on the heels of a mission extension comes news that scientists have now given up on attempts to persuade the NASA InSight lander's "mole" to burrow more than a few centimetres beneath the Martian surface.…

15/01/2021 20:07:43  

NASA Spaceline Current Awareness List #932 15 January 2021 (Space Life Science Research Results)
15/01/2021 20:07:40  

NASA Spaceline Current Awareness List #932 15 January 2021 (Space Life Science Research Results)
15/01/2021 20:07:40  

NASA to Host Virtual Briefing on February Perseverance Mars Rover Landing
15/01/2021 19:07:35  

NASA Langley Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License:
15/01/2021 19:07:34  

NASA JSC Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive Patent License