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04/04/2020 09:04:59  

A glimpse of life at Whaddon Hall

Vid An astonishingly rare film documenting British intelligence personnel, linked to the code-breakers at Bletchley Park, has been released by the park's trust, offering a glimpse of unsung heroes who helped win the Second World War.…

04/04/2020 09:04:57  

A summary of the major developments in the coronavirus outbreak across Australia

Good evening, and welcome to our daily roundup of the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic in Australia. These are the main stories on Saturday 4 April.

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04/04/2020 09:04:44  

The artist, who has splashed joyous spring colours over our anxieties, is on a roll, sequestered in France

David Hockney has a little advice for anyone who fancies taking up art as a lockdown hobby: take out the pencils or brushes, and put away the camera.

“I would suggest people could draw at this time,” he said from the house in Normandy where he has been sequestered since France practically closed down last month. “Question everything and do not think about photography.”

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04/04/2020 09:04:42  

  • Rare spotlight on Istiklol v Khujand Super Cup
  • No announced cases of coronavirus in the country

Tajikistan’s domestic football season is kicking off on schedule despite almost every other league around the globe having ground to a halt due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The clubs in the landlocked Central Asian country of nine million people are largely unknown outside Tajikstan but the Super Cup match between the champions, Istiklol, and the league runners-up, Khujand, on Saturday could bring some solace to fans this weekend with bookmakers already offering bets and even live streams of the game.

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04/04/2020 09:04:42  

Former England manager on his ‘perfect’ 2010 World Cup plans, selection issues and how Lampard’s ghost goal still haunts him

The fact Fabio Capello saw it coming and had warned them made it harder to take. “The most incredible thing that’s happened to me,” he calls it, which is saying something for a man who spent 56 years in the game, won the European Cup, four league titles as a player, nine as a manager, and has been to the World Cup with three countries.

One of those was England in 2010. It was not particularly memorable but the Italian can’t help it, not when Frank Lampard’s “ghost goal” haunts him even now 10 years on.

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04/04/2020 09:04:41  

He planned to hide his sexuality before his cowboy hit Old Town Road made him a superstar at 19. Now the rapper is ready to embrace life as a queer figurehead

When Lil Nas X was growing up in the small, conservative community of Lithia Springs outside Atlanta, Georgia, he was sure of two things. One: he wanted to be an entertainer. Two: he would never come out of the closet. Only one of those predictions proved to be true.

As a teenager who blasted SoundCloud rappers in his headphones and spent all his free time scrolling through Twitter, Lil Nas X quickly learned that it was easier to blend in than risk being different. He knew people who had come out at high school, and saw the pain, bullying and homophobia they experienced. He told himself he wasn’t cut out for it. So he dressed in his cousin’s hand-me-downs and, when he could afford them, purchased safe, muted clothes from Zara and H&M. He watched fashion shows on his smartphone, but never thought he would be brave or rich enough to wear such explicitly queer outfits.

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04/04/2020 09:04:41  

Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s characters step up to help children through crisis

Who has terrible tusks and terrible claws, purple prickles all over his back – and always maintains a strict two-metre distance from others when outside his cave?

The answer, as any young child knows, is the Gruffalo, but not as you have ever seen him before.

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04/04/2020 09:04:41  

The short-let platform’s business model has been exposed. Bookings have fallen off a cliff but Airbnb simply can’t change tack

“You would not have an empire without us,” an Airbnb host shouts down the lens in a video addressing the company’s billionaire co-founder and chief executive Brian Chesky. “It’s our homes on your platform. It’s our face on millions of listings. It’s our soul that brings the magic … It’s our place that makes you money.”

lol airbnb landlords are losing their minds because people canceled their trips due to the uh. global pandemic pic.twitter.com/2DeNluRuie

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04/04/2020 09:04:40  

Oncologists warn of postcode lottery, with even highest priority patients missing treatment

Cancer treatment has become a postcode lottery with many patients not receiving vital care as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, doctors have warned.

Leading oncologists have said that even those patients in category one and two priority, the highest for continuing treatment, are not receiving chemotherapy.

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04/04/2020 09:04:40  

Most banks will offer a break during the coronavirus crisis, but it doesn’t suit everyone

About 1 million mortgage holders have applied for a payment holiday in the past fortnight, according to industry sources. Should you do so, too?

1. It’s not free money. But it’s very cheap. Let’s be clear that you still have to pay for your holiday, the banks are not just writing off the money. They add whatever you didn’t pay to your total mortgage, and when the three months is up your repayments go up. But with interest rates so low, it makes surprisingly little difference. For example, using Moneyed.co.uk’s mortgage calculator, a £200,000 mortgage taken out in May 2018 at a 2.5% rate costs £897 a month. If you take the three-month holiday, afterwards the cost will rise to £910 a month. “If the choice is between really struggling or taking the mortgage holiday, then the additional cost further down the line is actually quite small beer,” says broker Ray Boulger of John Charcol.

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04/04/2020 09:04:31  

The Obama-produced Crip Camp offers a winning combination of the heartfelt and the hard-hitting. Plus, more real-life tales from Cuba to Uzbekistan

“Escapism” is an operative word when you’re hunkered down under quarantine and surveying your home viewing options, but how you interpret that is up to you. Many will opt for fiction and fantasy, for the furthest possible reaches from the glum news of the moment. Yet documentary films have their place in this comfort system too: they may not take you to another universe entirely, but at a time when a single global crisis unavoidably consumes all media attention and almost all personal conversation, the window they provide into other realities, past and present, can be a vital way to clear your head of current noise.

Netflix is a reliable source of good ones, and they’ve landed one of the year’s best so far in Crip Camp, an audience award winner at Sundance in January that manages to be a crowdpleaser without softening tricky subjects or taking sentimental shortcuts. It’s the second feature documentary to emerge from the Netflix-allied, Barack and Michelle Obama-founded production company Higher Ground: the first, last year’s outstanding American Factory, went on to win the Oscar.

It wouldn’t be a surprise to see Crip Camp earn similar plaudits for directors Nicole Newnham and James LeBrecht, the latter coming to this project with some personal investment. Born with spina bifida, and a disability rights activist since the early 70s, LeBrecht was once an attendee of Camp Jened, the groundbreaking New York state summer camp for young disabled people on which this moving film is centred. From 1951 to 1977, it was a place where teens with a variety of disabilities had their first experience of living as a community free from overprotective minders or oppressive bullies; many had their first, formative stirrings of both sexual and political consciousness along the way.

The directors blend heartening archive footage from the camp and contemporary interviews with its past beneficiaries, expanding from a nostalgia piece into a stirring overview of how the American disability rights movement hatched and grew from the spirit of empowered unity that the camp stood for. Judy Heumann, a former camp leader who became a leading activist and legislator for the independent living movement, emerges as the most prominent and galvanising hero in a film of many. From its blunt title’s defiant reclaiming of an ugly slur, Crip Camp is frank and forthright, warmly soulful but free of condescension: there aren’t many better new films out there right now.

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04/04/2020 09:04:24  

From love affairs and hippiedom to life as a cultural ambassador – a comprehensive biography unpicks the great sitar player’s complex legacy

Forever photographed sitting cross-legged and clutching his sitar, with incense burning, Ravi Shankar has been credited with almost single-handedly spreading the age-long traditions of Indian classical music to the western world. He is renowned for his punishing work ethic and collaborations with George Harrison, Philip Glass and Yehudi Menuhin. This first authorised biography is the product of 25 years’ research and interviews. For fans of Shankar and Indian classical, Oliver Craske’s mighty work will surely be a delight.

It details Shankar’s career from a childhood spent performing as a dancer in his older brother Uday’s troupe to his tentative beginnings as a sitar soloist, training under guru Allauddin Khan. His fame soared during the hippy movement of the 1960s and he spent his twilight years as a recognised composer and Indian cultural ambassador. Craske has a deep understanding of the complex and nuanced traditions of Indian classical and emphasises throughout that “it is crucial to retain the Indian perspective”. He focuses not just on the virtuosic showmanship of speed and accuracy but rather “the very serene part of the music, the spiritual, devotional and soothing part”, as Shankar said.

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04/04/2020 08:04:57  

People across China have paused for three minutes to remember the patients and medical workers who died in the coronavirus outbreak. Citizens stood still, while cars, trains and ships sounded their horns, and air-raid sirens rang out in memory of the more than 3,000 lives lost. In Wuhan, where the outbreak began, all traffic lights in urban areas turned red for three minutes. The city of 11 million was the hardest hit by the outbreak, recording 2,567 fatalities. This accounts for more than three quarters of China’s coronavirus deaths.



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04/04/2020 08:04:46  

Physical distancing, self-isolation and lockdown – the most striking photographs on coronavirus from around the world

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04/04/2020 08:04:45  

The governor of New York’s calm Covid-19 briefings have made him the most prominent Democrat of the crisis

It’s rare for a single US state governor to get so much attention it even rivals the president during a historical national crisis – but that’s exactly what New York’s Andrew Cuomo is experiencing.

Related: Cuomo wins praise for 'wisdom' amid coronavirus crisis as Trump blusters

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04/04/2020 08:04:44  

I Am Legend, City of God, Jurassic Park … it’s a good time to discover which books work well on film

We’ve certainly had some time on our hands, haven’t we? That’s unless you’re a parent and you’re home schooling; if so, shout out to you. To pass the time, as well as talking to my plants for several hours, I’ve been watching films. Specifically, films that have been adapted from books. When you start to look into it, there are more of these than you might have realised.

This week alone I’ve watched It (Stephen King’s book has been adapted twice, as a TV miniseries in 1990, and as a box office-smashing film in 2017. I can’t choose between the two as both are terrifying and sublime in their own way); Jurassic Park (Michael Crichton wrote such a long novel that the film adaptation is a welcome relief); Holes, both written and adapted by Louis Sachar (so joyful); and 1984 from George Orwell’s novel.

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04/04/2020 08:04:43  

Creatives who rely on live shows have been badly hit by Covid-19. Here are some ways to back them from your sofa

Back in the music industry’s 1990s boom, when tenner-a-pop CD sales were skyrocketing, going on tour was a good way of shifting more product. After digital piracy burst that bubble in the early 2000s, however, touring became more of a financial necessity, creating a new, lopsided business model only accentuated in recent years by the rise of subscription streaming services. With gigs and festivals essentially banned under new measures to stave off the spread of coronavirus, how can we help artists who can no longer tour?

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